Signs you over-fertilised your water plants!

What happens when you over-fertilised your water plants?

I’ve been having a lovely time recently, getting lots of new water plants including the Louisana irises and the Water Lotus. And recently I have rediscovered also found out what happens if you’ve over-fertilised your water plants!

Signs you over-fertilised your water plants

Water lotus leaf

Water plants

Water plants are great plants to grow if you have a bit of space. You don’t need a lot of space as you can just use a sealed pot. In fact it is easy to convert any pot to a water garden

I love water lilies and water lotus as they have such beautiful flowers.

Recently I obtained a number of new water irises. I already had some water irises, in the red and purple colours. However my local Big Green shed had a range of different coloured water irises on the take-me-home-and-love-me trays. I could not resist.

I took them home, repotted them and added them to various water pots that I already have growing.

With all the repotting however, I got a bit overzealous with the fertiliser! And a few days later I had a rampant dose of green algae in one or two of the pots! This is what happens when you over-fertilise water plants!

The plants didn’t seem to mind, but I did! It wasn’t just the bright green water. I knew that the algae would reduce the amount of light and oxygen in the water. this would impact on the small native fish I had in the pots. These fish are useful to help eliminate mosquitoes from breeding in the water pots.

So, I changed the water, giving the obviously over-fertilised water to a few of my other plants

There are a few different ways of dealing with algae growing in your water pots. One is to change the water, spreading the contaminated water around other non-water plants.

Signs you over-fertilised your water plants

Algal bloom from over-fertiliising

Another method is to treat the pots a dose of water clarifier. These can be purchased from your local nursery or pet shop. However I figure that it is easier, and less wasteful, to spread the over-fertilised water around a bit so as to not waste it

A final option, one I do not recommend is to pour the over-fertilised water down the drain and into the rainwater system.

The addition of over fertilised water is adding to the growth of noxious weeds in our waterways, so this in not a good option.

Happy gardening

from Rohanne, your Personal Garden Expert

 

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